All of the Best Microsoft Word Keyboard Shortcuts

Even if you’re familiar with Microsoft Word, you might be surprised by the number and variety of keyboard shortcuts you can use to speed up your work, and just generally make things more convenient.

Now, does anyone expect you to memorize all these keyboard combos? Of course not! Everyone’s needs are different, so some will be more useful to you than others. And even if you just pick up a few new tricks, it’s worth it. We’ve also tried to keep the list clean and simple, so go ahead and print it that helps!

Also, even though our list of shortcuts here is pretty long, it’s by no means a complete list of every keyboard combo available in Word. We’ve tried to keep it to the more generally useful shortcuts. And, you’ll be happy to know that almost all of these shortcuts have been around for a long time, so they should be useful no matter what version of Word you’re using.

General Program Shortcuts

There are many general program shortcuts in Microsoft Word that make it easier for you to do everything from save your document to undo a mistake.

  • Ctrl+N: Create a new document.
  • Ctrl+O: Open an existing document.
  • Ctrl+S: Save a document.
  • F12: Open the Save As dialog box.
  • Ctrl+W: Close a document.
  • Ctrl+Z: Undo an action.
  • Ctrl+Y: Redo an action.
  • Alt+Ctrl+S: Split a window or remove the split view.
  • Ctrl+Alt+V: Print Layout View.
  • Ctrl+Alt+O: Outline View.
  • Ctrl+Alt+N: Draft View.
  • Ctrl+F2: Print Preview View.
  • F1: Open the Help pane.
  • Alt+Q: Go to the Tell me what you want to do box.
  • F9: Refresh the field codes in the current selection.
  • Ctrl+F: Search a document.
  • F7: Run a spelling and grammar check.
  • Shift+F7: Open the thesaurus. If you have a word selected, Shift+F7 looks up that word in the thesaurus.

Moving Around in a Document

You can use keyboard shortcuts to easily navigate throughout your document. This can save time if you have a long document and don’t want to scroll through the entire thing, or simply want to easily move between words or sentences.

  • Left/Right Arrow: Move the insertion point (cursor) one character to the left or right.
  • Ctrl+Left/Right Arrow: Move one word to the left or right.
  • Up/Down Arrow: Move up or down one line.
  • Ctrl+Up/Down Arrow: Move up or down one paragraph.
  • End: Move to the end of the current line.
  • Ctrl+End: Move to the end of the document.
  • Home: Move to the beginning of the current line.
  • Ctrl+Home: Move to the beginning of the document.
  • Page Up/Page Down: Move up or down one screen.
  • Ctrl+Page Up/Page Down: Move to the previous or next browse object (after performing a search).
  • Alt+Ctrl+Page Up/Page Down: Move to the top or bottom of the current window
  • F5: Open the Find dialog box with the Go To tab selected, so you can quickly move to a specific page, section, bookmark, and so on.
  • Shift+F5: Cycle through the last three locations where the insertion point was placed. If you just opened a document, Shift+F5 moves you to the last point you were editing before closing the document.

Selecting Text

You may have noticed from the previous section that the arrow keys are used for moving your insertion point around, and the Ctrl key is used to modify that movement. Using the Shift key to modify a lot of those key combos lets you select text in different ways.

  • Shift+Left/Right Arrow: Extend your current selection by one character to the left or right.
  • Ctrl+Shift+Left/Right Arrow: Extend your current selection by one word to the left or right.
  • Shift+Up/Down Arrow: Extend selection up or down one line.
  • Ctrl+Shift+Up/Down Arrow: Extend selection to the beginning or end of the paragraph.
  • Shift+End: Extend selection to the end of the line.
  • Shift+Home: Extend selection to the beginning of the line.
  • Ctrl+Shift+Home/End: Extend selection to the beginning or end of the document.
  • Shift+Page Down/Page Up: Extend selection down or up one screen.
  • Ctrl+A: Select the entire document.
  • F8: Enter selection mode. While in this mode, you can use the arrow keys to extend your selection. You can also press F8 up to five times to extend the selection outward. The first press enters selection mode, the second press selects the word next to the insertion point, the third selects the whole sentence, the fourth all the characters in the paragraph, and the fifth the whole document. Pressing Shift+F8 works that same cycle, but backwards. And you can press Esc any time to leave selection mode. It takes a little playing with to get the hang of it, but it’s pretty fun.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F8: Selects a column. Once the column is selected, you can use the left and right arrow keys to extend the selection to other columns.

Editing Text

Word also provides a number of keyboard shortcuts for editing text.

  • Backspace: Delete one character to the left.
  • Ctrl+Backspace: Delete one word to the left.
  • Delete: Delete one character to the right.
  • Ctrl+Delete: Delete one word to the right.
  • Ctrl+C: Copy or graphics to the Clipboard text.
  • Ctrl+X: Cut selected text or graphics to the Clipboard.
  • Ctrl+V: Paste the Clipboard contents.
  • Ctrl+F3: Cut selected text to the Spike. The Spike is an interesting variant on the regular clipboard. You can keep cutting text to the Spike and Word remembers it all. When you paste the Spikes contents, Word pastes everything you cut, but places each item on its own line.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F3: Paste the Spike contents.
  • Alt+Shift+R: Copy the header or footer used in the previous section of the document.

Applying Character Formatting

Word also has loads of keyboard combos for applying character formatting (and paragraph formatting, but that’s covered in the next section. You can use the shortcuts to apply formatting to selected text or to whatever you type next if no text is selected.

  • Ctrl+B: Apply bold formatting.
  • Ctrl+I: Apply italic formatting.
  • Ctrl+U: Apply underline formatting.
  • Ctrl+Shift+W: Apply underline formatting to words, but not the spaces between words.
  • Ctrl+Shift+D: Apply double underline formatting.
  • Ctrl+D: Open the Font dialog box.
  • Ctrl+Shift+< or >: Decrease or increase font size one preset size at a time.
  • Ctrl+[ or ]: Decrease or increase font size one point at a time.
  • Ctrl+=: Apply subscript formatting.
  • Ctrl+Shift++ (plus): Apply superscript formatting.
  • Shift+F3: Cycle through case formats for your text. Available formats are sentence case (capital first letter, everything else lower case), lowercase, uppercase, title case (first letter in each word capitalized), and toggle case (which reverses whatever’s there).
  • Ctrl+Shift+A: Formats all letters as uppercase.
  • Ctrl+Shift+K: Formats all letters as lowercase.
  • Ctrl+Shift+C: Copies the character formatting of a selection.
  • Ctrl+Shift+V: Pastes formatting onto selected text.
  • Ctrl+Space: Removes all manual character formatting from a selection.

Applying Paragraph Formatting

And just like with character formatting, Word has a bunch of shortcuts particular to formatting paragraphs.

  • Ctrl+M: Increases a paragraph’s indent one level each time you press it.
  • Ctrl+Shift+M: Reduces a paragraph’s indent one level each time you press it.
  • Ctrl+T: Increases a hanging indent each time you press it.
  • Ctrl+Shift+T: Reduces a hanging indent each time you press it.
  • Ctrl+E: Center a paragraph.
  • Ctrl+L: Left-align a paragraph.
  • Ctrl+R: Right-align a paragraph.
  • Ctrl+J: Justify a paragraph.
  • Ctrl+1: Set single-spacing.
  • Ctrl+2: Set double-spacing.
  • Ctrl+5: Set 1.5 line Spacing.
  • Ctrl+0: Remove one line spacing preceding a paragraph.
  • Ctrl+Shift+S: Open a popup window for applying styles.
  • Ctrl+Shift+N: Apply the normal paragraph style.
  • Alt+Ctrl+1: Apply the Heading 1 style.
  • Alt+Ctrl+2: Apply the Heading 2 style.
  • Alt+Ctrl+3: Apply the Heading 3 style.
  • Ctrl+Shift+L: Apply the List style.
  • Ctrl+Q: Remove all paragraph formatting.

Inserting Things

Whether you’re looking to insert a section break in your document, or you just don’t feel like digging for a common symbol, Word’s keyboard combos have you covered.

  • Shift+Enter: Insert a line break.
  • Ctrl+Enter: Insert a page break.
  • Ctrl+Shift+Enter: Insert a column break.
  • Ctrl+ (hyphen key): Insert­­ an optional hyphen or en dash. An optional hyphen tells Word not to use a hyphen, unless the word breaks at the end of a line. If it does, Word will use a hyphen where you placed it.
  • Alt+Ctrl+ (hyphen): Insert an em dash.
  • Ctrl+Shift+ (hyphen): Insert a non-breaking hyphen. This tells Word not to break a word at the end of a line, even if there’s a hyphen there. This would be useful, for example, if you included something like a telephone number and wanted to make sure it all appeared on one line.
  • Ctrl+Shift+Space: Insert a non-breaking space.
  • Alt+Ctrl+C: Insert a copyright symbol.
  • Alt+Ctrl+R: Insert a registered trademark symbol.
  • Alt+Ctrl+T: Insert a trademark symbol.

Working with Outlines

Hopefully, you outline before cracking into a long document. If you’re among those organized, outlining souls, here are a few shortcuts to help you out.

  • Alt+Shift+Left/Right Arrow: Promote (move to the left) or demote (move to the right) a line.
  • Ctrl+Shift+N: Demote an outline level to regular body text.
  • Alt+Shift+Up/Down Arrow: Move the line with the insertion point up or down in the outline.
  • Alt+Shift++/ (plus/minus): Expand or collapse text under a heading.
  • Alt+Shift+A: Expand or collapse all text or headings in an outline.
  • Alt+Shift+L: Show the first line of body text or all body text.
  • Alt+Shift+1: Show all headings that have the Heading 1 style applied.
  • Alt+Shift+any other number key: Show all headings up to that level.

Working with Tables

Moving around in tables doesn’t work quite like moving around in regular text. Instead of clicking where you want to go, check out these combos:

  • Tab: Move to the next cell in a row and select its contents, if there are any.
  • Shift+Tab: Move to the previous cell in a row and select its contents, if there are any.
  • Alt+Home/End: Move to the first or last cell in a row.
  • Alt+Page Up/Page Down: Move to the first or last cell in a column.
  • Up/Down Arrow: Move to the previous or next row.
  • Shift+Up/Down Arrow: Select the cell in the row above or below the insertion point or selection. Keep pressing this combo to keep selecting more cells. If you have multiple cells in a row selected, this combo selects those same cells in the row above or below.
  • Alt+5 on keypad (with NumLock off): Select an entire table.

And that’s about it. Hopefully, you’ve found a few new keyboard shortcuts to make your life in Word a little easier!

What Your Function Keys Do in Microsoft Word

The function keys on keyboards don’t get the love they used to, but depending on the app you’re running, they can still be quite handy. Word, in particular, has some interesting features tucked away behind your function keys. Here’s what they do.

F1

  • F1: Get help. How this works depends on what you’re looking at in the Word window. Press F1 in the regular document window, for example, to open Word’s Help pane. Sometimes, though, pressing F1 takes you to Microsoft’s support site and shows you more targeted articles about the feature you’re looking at. This is the case most of the time when you press F1 while a dialog box is open.
  • Shift+F1: Open Word’s Reveal Formatting pane, where you can see the character and paragraph formatting of whatever text you have selected.
  • Alt+F1: Jump to the next field if you’ve got fields in your document.
  • Alt+Shift+F1: Jumps to the previous field in your document.

F2

  • F2: Move text or objects. Select the text or object you want to move and then hit F2. Place your insertion point where you’d like to move the item and then hit Enter.
  • Shift+F2: Copy selected text. It’s just like hitting Ctrl+C.
  • Ctrl+F2: Open the Print window, where you can preview and print your document.
  • Alt+Shift+F2: Save your document. If you haven’t saved your document previously, it opens the Save As window.
  • Alt+Ctrl+F2: Pop up the Open window so you can open a document.

F3

  • F3: Expand an AutoText entry. Type at least the first four letters in the name of your AutoText entry and then press F3 to expand it to the full text.
  • Alt+F3: Create an AutoText entry from selected text.
  • Shift+F3: Change the case of selected text. Pressing this combo repeatedly cycles through the following case styles: Initial Letter Case, ALL CAPS CASE, and lower case.
  • Ctrl+F3: Cut selected text to the Spike. You can cut as much text as you want this way and it all accumulates on the Spike.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F3: Insert the contents of the Spike. Performing this action also clears any text in the Spike.

F4

  • F4: Repeat your last action.
  • Shift+F4: Repeat the last Find action. This one’s handy because you can use it to browse search results without having the Find and Replace window or Navigation pane.
  • Ctrl+F4: Close the current document. You’ll be asked to save the document if you’ve made any changes.
  • Alt+F4: Quit Microsoft Word. This closes all open documents (giving you the chance to save changes first) and exits Word.

F5

  • F5: Open Go To tab on the Find and Replace window. You can use this to quickly jump to a page, section, bookmark, and so on.
  • Shift+F5: Jump the previous edit you made in your document. Press it again go one more edit back. Word remembers your last two edits. This works even after saving and closing a document, letting you return to where you left off when you open the document again.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F5: Open the Bookmark window so you can edit bookmarks. If your insertion point is in an existing bookmark, pressing this combo opens the Bookmark window and selects that bookmark.

F6

  • F6: Go to the next pane or frame in your Word window. You can use this to navigate the window without using your mouse.
  • Shift+F6: Go to the previous pane or frame.
  • Ctrl+F6: Go to the next open document window.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F6: Go to the previous open document window.

F7

  • F7: Open the Editor pane and start a spelling and grammar check.
  • Shift+F7: Open the thesaurus. If you have a word selected when you press this combo, Word opens the thesaurus and looks up the selected word.
  • Alt+F7: Find the next spelling or grammar error in your document.
  • Alt+Shift+F7: Open the Translation pane.

F8

  • F8: Enter Word’s selection mode and expand a selection. While in this mode, you can use the arrow keys to extend your selection. You can also press F8 up to five times to extend the selection outward. The first press enters selection mode, the second press selects the word next to the insertion point, the third selects the whole sentence, the fourth all the characters in the paragraph, and the fifth the whole document.
  • Shift+F8: Reduce a selection. This works the same way as expanding a selection, but backward.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F8: Selects a column. Once the column is selected, you can use the left and right arrow keys to extend the selection to other columns.

F9

  • F9: Update a field. This is the same as right-clicking a field and choosing the Update Field command.
  • Shift+F9: Reveal a field’s code.
  • Ctrl+F9: Insert new Empty Field {} braces.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F9: Unlink a field.
  • Alt+F9: Toggle the display of a field’s code.

F10

  • F10: Show key tips. Pressing this combo reveals single letter shortcuts you can use to access Word’s menu commands.
  • Shift+F10: Display a context menu. This works just like right-clicking.
  • Ctrl+F10: Maximize document window.
  • Alt+Shift+F10: Display a menu or window for an available selection.

F11

  • F11: Jump to the next field in your document.
  • Shift+F11: Jump to the previous field in your document.
  • Ctrl+F11: Lock a field so it cannot be edited.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F11: Unlock a field.
  • Alt+Shift+F11: Start the Microsoft Script Editor.

F12

  • F12: Open the Save As window.
  • Shift+F12: Save your document.
  • Ctrl+F12: Open the Open window.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F12: Open the Print window.

Microsoft Word has loads of great keyboard shortcuts, and its support for the function keys on your keyboard is no exception.

What Your Function Keys Do in Microsoft Powerpoint

The function keys on keyboards don’t get the love they used to, but depending on the app you’re running, they can still be quite handy. Microsoft PowerPoint has some interesting features tucked away behind your function keys. Here’s what they do.

F1

  • F1: When you’re in editing mode, pressing F1 displays the help menu. When you’re in slideshow mode, pressing F1 reveals the slideshow’s controls so you can do things like moving forward or backward in your presentation.
  • Ctrl+F1: Close and reopen the current task pane.

F2

  • F2: When you have an object that contains text (like a text box or other shape), pressing F2 cycles between selecting the text for editing and selecting the object itself for moving or formatting.
  • Ctrl+F2: Open the Print window, where you can preview and print your document.
  • Alt+F2: Open the Save As window.
  • Alt+Shift+F2: Save the active presentation that you’re working on. This will not save all open presentations.

F3

  • Shift+F3: Change the case of selected text. Pressing this combo repeatedly cycles through the following case styles: Initial Letter Case, ALL CAPS CASE, and lower case.

F4

  • F4: Repeat your last action.
  • Shift+F4: Repeat the last Find action. This one’s handy because you can use it to browse search results without having the Find and Replace window open.
  • Ctrl+F4: Close the presentation window.
  • Alt+F4: Quit Microsoft Powerpoint. This closes all open presentations (giving you the chance to save changes first) and exits Powerpoint.

F5

  • F5: Begin a slideshow with your active presentation from the first slide.
  • Shift+F5: Begin a slideshow from your current slide. This is handy when testing how the presentation view will look.
  • Ctrl+F5: Restore the size of your presentation window.

F6

  • F6: Move between the ribbon, worksheet, tabs, and status bar.
  • Shift+F6: Move in reverse order between the ribbon, worksheet, tabs, and status bar.
  • Ctrl+F6: Switch to the next presentation window when more than one presentation window is open.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F6: Switch to the previous presentation window when more than one presentation window is open.

F7

  • F7: Open the Editor pane and starts a spelling and grammar check.
  • Ctrl+F7: Move the presentation window (when it isn’t maximized).
  • Shift+F7: Open the thesaurus. If you have a word selected when you press this combo, Excel opens the thesaurus and looks up the selected word.

F8

  • Alt+F8: Display the Macros dialog box.
  • Ctrl+F8: Resize the presentation window (when it isn’t maximized).

F9

  • Shift+F9: Show or hide a grid that aids you in aligning objects.
  • Ctrl+F9: Minimize the active presentation window.
  • Alt+F9: Show or hide movable guidelines that aid you in aligning objects.

F10

  • F10: Turn key tips on or off. Key tips display shortcut letters on menus that you can press to navigate menus and activate commands.
  • Shift+F10: Display a context menu. This works just like right-clicking.
  • Ctrl+F10: Maximize or restore the active presentation window.
  • Alt+F10: Maximize the program window.
  • Alt+Shift+F10: Display the menu or message for a smart tag (If more than one smart tag is present, switches to the next smart tag and displays its menu or message.).

F11

  • Alt+F11: Switch between the Visual Basic Editor and the previously active window.
  • Alt+Shift+F11: Open the Microsoft Script Editor.

F12

  • F12: Open the Save As window.
  • Shift+F12: Save your presentation.
  • Ctrl+F12: Open the Open window.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F12: Open the Print window.

What Your Function Keys Do In Microsoft Excel

The function keys on keyboards don’t get the love they used to, but depending on the app you’re running, they can still be quite handy. Microsoft Excel has some interesting features tucked away behind your function keys. Here’s what they do.

F1

  • F1: Get help. How this works depends on what you’re looking at in the Excel window. Press F1 in the regular window, for example, to open the Help pane. Sometimes, though, pressing F1 takes you to Microsoft’s support site and shows you more targeted articles about the feature you’re looking at. This is the case most of the time when you press F1 while a dialog box is open.
  • Ctrl+F1: Hide and unhide the Excel Ribbon.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F1: Hide and unhide the Excel Ribbon, the title bar, and the status bar at the bottom of the window. This gives you something like a full-page view of your sheet.
  • Alt+F1: Create an embedded chart from data in the currently selected range.
  • Alt+Shift+F1: Create a new worksheet.

F2

  • F2: Turn on editing in the cell and places your insertion point at the end of the cell’s data. If editing is disabled for a cell, this combo moves your insertion point into the formula bar instead.
  • Ctrl+F2: Open the Print window, where you can preview and print your document.
  • Shift+F2: Allow you to insert or edit comments on selected cells.
  • Alt+Shift+F2: Save the current workbook.

F3

  • F3: Open the Paste Name window if you have defined names in the workbook.
  • Ctrl+F3: Open the name manager dialog box so you can create and edit defined names.
  • Shift+F3: Open function insert dialog box.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F3: Open the Create Names From Selection window, which lets you create new names using selected rows and columns.

F4

  • F4: Repeat your last action. If you have a cell reference or range selected when you hit F4, Excel cycles through available references.
  • Shift+F4: Repeat the last find action. This one’s handy because you can use it to browse search results without having the Find and Replace window open.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F4: Work the same as Shift+F4 but works toward the beginning of the document.
  • Ctrl+F4: Close the current workbook. You’ll be asked to save the document if you’ve made any changes.
  • Alt+F4: Quit Microsoft Excel. This closes all open workbooks (giving you the chance to save changes first) and exits the program.

F5

  • F5: Open the Go To window where you can jump to a named range or address.
  • Shift+F5: Open the Find And Replace window.
  • Ctrl+F5: Restore the window size of the active workbook window.

F6

  • F6: Move between the Ribbon, worksheet, tabs, and status bar. In a worksheet that has been split, this combo moves you to the next pane.
  • Shift+F6: Move in reverse order between the Ribbon, worksheet, tabs, and status bar. In a worksheet that has been split, this combo moves you to the previous pane.
  • Ctrl+F6: Switch to the next workbook window when you have more than one workbook window open.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F6: Switch to the previous workbook window when you have more than one workbook window open.

F7

  • F7: Perform spell check in the selected range.
  • Shift+F7: Open the thesaurus. If you have a word selected when you press this combo, Excel opens the thesaurus and looks up the selected word.

F8

  • F8: Turn the extend selection mode on and off. While in this mode, you can use your arrow keys to extend or reduce the current selection of cells.
  • Shift+F8: Turn the Add to Selection mode on and off. While in this mode you can use arrow keys or your mouse to add non-adjacent cells to your currently selected cells.
  • Alt+F8: Display the Macros dialog box.

F9

  • F9: Refresh a workbook. Refreshing the workbook performs new calculations on all formulas.
  • Shift+F9: Perform calculations on the active worksheet.
  • Ctrl+Alt+F9: Calculate all formulas on all worksheets in all open workbooks, regardless of whether they have changed since the last calculation.
  • Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F9: Recheck dependent formulas and then calculate all cells in all open workbooks.

F10

  • F10: Turn key tips on or off. Key tips display shortcut letters on menus that you can press to navigate menus and activate commands.
  • Shift+F10: Display a context menu. This works just like right-clicking.
  • Ctrl+F10: Maximize or restores the selected workbook window.
  • Alt+F10: Maximize the program window.
  • Alt+Shift+F10: Display the menu or message for a smart tag. If more than one smart tag is present, this combo switches to the next smart tag and displays its menu or message.

F11

  • F11: Create a chart of selected data in a separate chart sheet.
  • Shift+F11: Create a new worksheet.
  • Alt+F11: Switch between the Visual Basic Editor and the active workbook.
  • Alt+Shift+F11: Open the Microsoft Script Editor.

F12

  • F12: Open the Save As window.
  • Shift+F12: Save the current workbook.
  • Ctrl+F12: Open the Open window.
  • Ctrl+Shift+F12: Open the Print window.

How to Make a Border or Frame on a PowerPoint Slide

Although there’s not a specific command to add a border to a whole slide, there are a couple of ways you can make it happen. One way is to create a border using the outline of a shape. The second is to use the Bing Image Search feature built into PowerPoint to search for and insert a border. Let’s see how it’s done.

Adding a Border to a Slide Using a Shape Outline

Open up your presentation and select the slide to which you want to add a border.

Switch to the Insert tab and then click the Shapes button. Select a shape from the Rectangles category. In this example, we’re using a basic rectangle with squared edges.

A crosshair symbol displays. Using your mouse, position the crosshair symbol on the upper-left corner of your slide.

Press (and hold) and drag your mouse to draw a rectangle shape to encompass your whole slide. Release your mouse to finish drawing. If you don’t get the positioning right on the first try, you can grab any of the handles on the shape and drag them to resize.

Now that you’ve got the size of the border right, you’ll want to eliminate the background color from the shape. On the Format tab, click the Shape Fill” button and then click the No Fill command from the drop-down menu.

By default, your rectangle shape has a thin border, but you can make it thicker if you want. On the Format tab, click the Shape Outline button. On the drop-down menu that appears, point to the Weight option and then select a thickness for your border. In this example, we’re going with a 6 pt thickness. The result is a thick border around your slide.

Want an even thicker border? On that Shape Outline drop-down menu, click the More Lines command to open the Format Shape pane. In the Line section of that pane, you can adjust the adjust the Width setting to whatever you like either by entering a point size or clicking on the up and down arrows. In this example, we increased the width to 20 pt.

To add the border to additional slides, select your shape and then click the Copy button on the Home tab (or just hit Ctrl+C). Switch to a different slide and then click the Paste button (or press Ctrl+V).

Searching for a Border via Bing Image Search

Rather than adding a simple shape outline for a border, you can also search for a fancier border image. Select the slide where you want to add a border, switch to the Insert tab, and then click the Online Pictures button.

Enter a search phrase, such as line borders or flower borders in the Bing Image Search box, and then click Search (or press Enter key).

Click on a border you like and then click Insert to add it to your slide.

That’s all there is to it!

We do have another little bonus tip for you. If you’re using a background image on your slide and all you want is a white border around it, you don’t even need to add a border. You can resize your background image so that it’s slightly smaller than your slide. Doing so gives the illusion that’s there’s a white border around your slides. Take a look:

Pretty neat!

How to Draw and Manipulate Arrows in Microsoft PowerPoint

Whether you need to point to an image or chart for emphasis, show movement, or demonstrate a process flow, PowerPoint offers a wide range of arrow shapes. Here’s how to use them.

Drawing a Basic Arrow Shape

First, let’s review the steps on how to draw a basic arrow. On the Insert tab, click the Shapes button. In Lines group on the drop-down menu, click the Line Arrow option.

A crosshair symbol will display. Press and hold your mouse button, then drag to draw the arrow. Release the mouse button to finish drawing the arrow.

Here’s the result:

Resizing, Rotating, and Changing the Color of Arrows

Need to customize your plain looking arrow? No problem. If you don’t change a thing, your arrow will default to the normal settings, which is black for the color and 3/4 pt for the width. But maybe you need a thick, short, dark red arrow, or a long, thin green arrow. You can make changes it in a snap.

Resizing an Arrow

You can change the length of your arrow by clicking and dragging the handle on either end of the arrow. If you don’t want the arrow to rotate while you resize it, hold the Shift key down while clicking and dragging.

Changing the Color of an Arrow

To change an arrow’s color, first, click to select the arrow. On the Format tab, click the Shape Outline button and then click the color of your choice.

Changing the Thickness of an Arrow

To change the thickness of the arrow, click the same Shape Outline button, point to the Weight menu, and then click on the thickness you want.

Rotating an Arrow

You can rotate an arrow by clicking and dragging the handle on either end of an arrow. That’s the most useful option if you need to have the arrow point at a specific object in your presentation.

There are some more rotation options available, though. Select the arrow and then switch over to the Format tab. Click the Rotate button and choose a rotation option. Hovering over each option lets you preview how your arrow will look.

For even more rotation options, click the More Rotation Options command. In the Size options in the Format Shape pane, you can specify an exact rotation in degrees.

Using Block, Curved, and Connector Arrows

You don’t have to settle for just a straight arrow. There are many more arrow types available including block arrows, curved arrows, and connector arrows. Let’s take a look.

How to Create a Block Arrow

On the Insert tab, click the Shapes button. In the Block Arrows section of the drop-down menu, click the arrow style you want. In this example, we’re using an upward block arrow.

Your pointer turns into a crosshair symbol. Click and drag to draw the arrow to the size you want and release the mouse button to finish.

You can use the same formatting tools we talked about in the previous section to change the color, outline, and so on. Also, you can grab any of the eight white handles to resize the overall arrow. Grab the yellow handles to reshape the arrow’s head and shaft separately.

How to Create a Curved Arrow

On the Insert tab, click the Shapes button. In the Lines section of the drop-down menu, click one of the curved arrow shapes. You’ll find one with a single arrowhead, one with two heads, and a simple curved line with no arrowheads.

Your pointer turns into a crosshair symbol. Click and drag to draw the arrow. Release the mouse button to finish.

After drawing the curved arrow, you can change the curve by dragging the yellow handle in the center of the arrow. Here, we’ve dragged it out to the right to make a more sweeping curve.

For even more curved arrow options, check the curved arrows in the Block Arrows section.

And remember, just like with any other shape, you can use the standard formatting tools to change the color, outline, and so on.

How to Create a Straight Connector Arrow

Finally, there’s the connector arrow. These are great for connecting the kinds of shapes you’d use in flowcharts or organizational diagrams.

On the Insert tab, click the Shapes button. In the Lines section of the drop-down menu, choose one of the connector arrows. As with curved arrows, the difference is how many arrowheads you want.

Your pointer turns into a crosshair symbol. Click and drag to draw the arrow. Release the mouse button to finish.

After drawing the connector arrow, you can grab the yellow handle to change the shape of the arrow. Use the white handles at either end to change the length of that portion of the arrow.

How to Snap Arrows and Shapes Together

If you add arrows to existing shapes, keeping them together may be helpful when you need to move them, manipulate them, or align them on a slide. To keep arrows and shapes connected, you can snap them together. This also helps make arrows connecting shapes on something like a flowchart look more seamless. Let’s see how it’s done.

Let’s say we have two rectangle shapes and we want a connector arrow running between them.

On the Insert menu, click the Shapes button and then choose a connector arrow from the drop-down menu. We’re going with a simple, single-headed elbow arrow.

Hover your pointer over the shape you want the arrow coming from, and you’ll see the four handles on the edges of the shape turn gray.

Click and hold one of those gray handles and drag to start creating the arrow. Move your pointer over the shape to which you want to connect the other end of the arrow, and you’ll see the gray handles appear there, too. Position your pointer over one to snap the arrow to it and then release your mouse button.

You’ve now connected two shapes with an arrow.

The real beauty of having connected shapes is that if you decide to move a shape, the arrow stays connected. There’s no need to reposition the arrow afterward.

And, of course, you can use any of the formatting or repositioning tricks we’ve talked about in the rest of this article on your connected arrow,  all without breaking the connection.

How to Print a Range of Pages in a Multi-Section Word Document

When you print in Microsoft Word, you can print the whole document, the current page, or a range of pages. But what if you have a document with multiple sections, each of which has its own page numbering? There’s a nifty little trick you can use to specify a range of pages in a particular section, or across multiple sections. Let’s take a look.

In Word, switch to the File menu and then click the Print command.

On the right, click the Print All Pages button and then choose the Custom Print option on the drop-down menu.

In the Settings Area, you’ll type the range of pages you want to print in the Pages box, and here’s where the trick comes in. To specify section and page numbers, you’ll use the following syntax:

p#s#-p#s#

That’s the page and section number of the first page you want to print, followed by a dash, followed by the page and section number of the last page you want to print.

To print nonadjacent pages or nonadjacent sections, you can use a comma instead of a dash to separate the page and section numbers when you type them. You can also use s# by itself to print all pages of a particular section.

Let’s look at a few examples.

First, let’s say you wanted to print pages 1-3 of section 2. For that, you’d type p1s2-p3s2.

Now, let’s complicate it a bit and say you wanted to print page 3 of section 1 through page 1 of section 2. For that, you’d type p3s1-p1s2.

You can also print entire sections by just specifying the section number. For example, if you wanted to print all the pages in sections 1 and 3 (but none from section 2), you could type s1,s3.

Now, let’s take a look at a more complicated, compound example. Say you wanted to print pages 2-5 of section 1 and pages 1-4 of section 3. Those are two ranges of pages that are not contiguous with one another. For that, you’d type p2s1-p5s1,p1s3-p4s3.

When you’re ready to print, click the Print button.

One more quick tip: If you’re ever unsure of the section number you want to use, you can find out quickly by opening up the header or footer area on a page in that section (by double-click the header or footer). Word will show you the section number right there.

As you can see, there are lots of little hidden features in Word that you’d never run across by accident. Hopefully, you find this one useful.

How to Prevent PowerPoint from Automatically Resizing Text

In PowerPoint, when you type, you may notice that if you enter more text than can fit inside a text placeholder, the text is automatically resized to a smaller size. This is called AutoFit. In some cases, that might be helpful; in other cases, it might not. Here’s how to turn that off.

The best case for turning off AutoFit is when you know how big you want a box (or any shape) to be on your slide and you know the size you want the text to be. In that case, it makes more sense to let the text overflow the box so that you can edit the text down to a point where it fits.

AutoFit Options

First, let’s take a look at what happens when you type inside a text placeholder. If you type more than will fit in the placeholder, the AutoFit Options button displays. Click on the AutoFit Options button to view the available options.

In this example, the AutoFit Text to Placeholder option is selected.

To turn AutoFit off for the active text box and allow text to move beyond the placeholder border, click Stop Fitting Text to This Placeholder.

Now, if you type text outside the boundary of the text placeholder, the additional text will be added and the text size will not change.

Now, you can edit the text to the point where it fits in your box. You could also try different fonts and paragraph spacing to see if you can make your text fit rather than just letting PowerPoint resize the text.

AutoCorrect Options

Want to turn off AutoFit globally for all new text placeholders that you add? You can turn AutoFit off via the AutoCorrect options, and there are 2 method to do that.

Method 1: One method is to click on the AutoFit Options button when it pops up and then click Control AutoCorrect Options.

Method 2: Another method to access the AutoCorrect Options is via File > Options > Proofing > AutoCorrect Options.

Whichever method you use to get there, you’ll find yourself in the AutoCorrect window. On the AutoFormat As You Type tab, disable the AutoFit title text to placeholder and AutoFit body text to placeholder checkboxes to turn AutoFit off.

To keep AutoFit on, keep these boxes checked.

And there’s all there is to it!

The 20 Most Useful PowerPoint Shortcuts

Keyboard shortcuts are a great way to improve your productivity with PowerPoint. Why? Because usually, you already have your hands on the keyboard. There is no need to disrupt your workflow by reaching for the mouse and moving the mouse cursor across the screen.

This post will introduce you to twenty very useful keyboard shortcuts for PowerPoint 2013/2016 (Note: Please note that I don’t include common Windows shortcuts such as Ctrl+C (copy) and Ctrl+V (paste) in the list).

Working with Shapes and Slides

  • Ctrl+D: Duplicates the selected item (shape, slide, etc.), which is much faster than copy and paste.
  • Ctrl+G: Groups the selected shapes together (use Ctrl+Shift+G to ungroup them).
  • Ctrl+Y: Redoes the last action.
  • Ctrl+Shift+C: Copies the formatting of a shape (use Ctrl+Shift+V to paste it to another shape).
  • Ctrl+Alt+V: Opens the Paste Special dialog box.

Formatting and Editing text

  • Ctrl+Shift+>: Increases the font size of the selected shape (use Ctrl+Shift+. on a QUERTZ keyboard).
  • Ctrl+Shift+<: Decreases the font size of the selected shape (use Ctrl+Shift+, on a QUERTZ keyboard).
  • Ctrl+B: Applies bold format to the selected text/shape.
  • Ctrl+I: Applies italic format to the selected text/shape.
  • Ctrl+E: Centers the text in the selected shape.
  • Ctrl+L: Left-aligns the text in the selected shape.
  • Ctrl+R: Right-aligns the text in the selected shape.
  • Shift+Enter: Creates a line break in the text (instead of a paragraph break that is inserted when simply pressing Enter) at the current position.

Navigating

  • Ctrl+F1: Hides/unhides the Ribbon (very useful for quickly freeing up space on small screens).
  • Ctrl+Shift+Tab: Switches between the Thumbnail Pane and the Outline View Pane.
  • Alt+F10: Shows/hides the Selection Pane.
  • Alt+F5: Shows the presentation in Presenter View.
  • Shift+F5: Starts the presentation from the current slide.

While presenting

  • +: Zooms into the slide (up to three zoom levels), once zoomed in, you can pan the slide with the mouse cursor or the arrow keys.
  • : Zooms out of the slide to provide an overview of all slides of the presentation (including sections).
  • B: Blacks the screen.

(Bonus) Combined mouse-keyboard shortcuts

  • Shift+Select Item with Mouse: Adds the item to the current selection (makes it easy to quickly select multiple shapes on a slide).
  • Ctrl+Move Item with Mouse: Duplicates the selected item.
  • Shift+Move Item with Mouse: Restricts movement of the item to straight up/down or left/right.
  • Alt+Move Item with Mouse: Moves the item with Smart Guides and Snap to Point features turned off (can be helpful when making small position adjustments).
  • Ctrl+Resize Item with Mouse: Resizes the item around its center.
  • Shift+Resize Item with Mouse: Keeps the original proportions of the item while resizing it.
  • Alt+Resize Item with Mouse: Resizes the item with Smart Guides and Snap to Point features turned off.

How to Embed a YouTube Video in PowerPoint?

How to take your presentation to the next level? It’s simple with these 4 easy tips on How to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint presentations for every PowerPoint version.

Graphics and animations are the nuts and bolts of a PowerPoint presentation, but you can take things to the next level by inserting animations or videos. Adding a YouTube video can really spice up the presentation and provide a new way to convey information. Not only does it help to transfer knowledge in a shorter period of time, studies have also shown that videos are effective in influencing a person’s choices and actions.

Follow our essential guide to learn how to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint and step up your business presentation game.

Before you insert a YouTube video into your PowerPoint presentation, you’ll need to consider 3 MAIN THINGS:

  1. Which version of PowerPoint are you using?
  2. Do you want to format the appearance of the YouTube video?
  3. Will you have an Internet connection available for video playback?

Once you’ve established which PowerPoint version you’re using, select the best method you’d like to use depending on your requirements.

If you are using Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 or PowerPoint 2016, we recommend for you to use method 1 or 2. If you are using PowerPoint 2007, you can try using method 3 or 4.

METHOD 1: INSERTING AN ONLINE YOUTUBE VIDEO

Conveniences

  • Fast and easy approach for PowerPoint Version 2010 onwards;
  • Able to adjust the size of the video in the slide.

Requirements: Internet connection.

Instructrion

  1. Go to YouTube and choose your preferred video;
  2. Copy the URL link from the address bar;
  3. Open your PowerPoint presentation and select the slide to add the video;
  4. Click on the Insert tab, then choose VideoOnline Video;
  5. In the newly opened window, paste your copied URL into the first address bar;
  6. Select the video thumbnail that appears and press Enter on your keyboard;

Or, you can also select a YouTube video directly from PowerPoint:

  1. Open your PowerPoint presentation and select the slide to add the video;
  2. Click on the Insert tab, then choose VideoOnline Video;
  3. Type the name of the YouTube video in the first address bar and click on the magnifying glass icon or press Enter on your keyboard;
  4. Select the correct video thumbnail that appears and press Enter on your keyboard.

METHOD 2: UTILIZING THE YOUTUBE EMBED CODE

Conveniences

  • Moderately fast and easy approach for PowerPoint Version 2010 onwards;
  • More video adjustments available with YouTube API parameters.

Requirements: Internet connection.

Instructrion

  1. Go to YouTube and choose your preferred video;
  2. Click on ShareEmbed below the video and copy the entire string;
  3. Open your PowerPoint presentation and select the slide to add the video;
  4. Click on the Insert tab, then choose VideoOnline Video;
  5. In the newly opened window, paste the embed code into the From a Video Embed Code field and press Enter on your keyboard.

To make adjustments to your video, you can add certain parameters into the embed code.

METHOD 3: USING A WEB-BASED TOOL

Conveniences

  • Efficient method;
  • Applicable for PowerPoint Version 2007 onwards;
  • Able to adjust the size of the video in the slide;
  • Does not require Internet connection.

Inconveniences: Speed is dependent on video size during conversion and download.

Instructrion

  1. Choose your preferred video from Youtube and copy the URL link from the address bar;
  2. Go to clipconverter.cc , paste the URL at Video URL to Download and click Continue;
  3. Select the conversion format and video resolution and click Start;
  4. Once the conversion is done, you can then download the completed file;
  5. Next, open your PowerPoint presentation and select the slide to add the video;
  6. Click on the Insert tab, then choose MovieMovie from File or VideoVideo on my PC;
  7. Locate the saved video and click OK;
  8. Choose whether you would like the video to play Automatically or When Clicked.

METHOD 4: INSTALLING THE DEVELOPER TAB

Conveniences: Able to adjust the size of the video in the slide.

Inconveniences: Moderately hard approach for PowerPoint Version 2007.

Requirements: Internet connection.

Instructrion

  1. Open your PowerPoint presentation and click on the Microsoft Office button at the top-left corner;
  2. Select PowerPoint Options from the drop-down box;
  3. In the Popular category, ensure that the Show Developer tab is selected and click OK;
  4. Next, select the slide to insert your video and click on the Developer tab;
  5. Choose More Controls;
  6. Scroll down to select Shockwave Flash Object and click OK;
  7. Now, click and drag to draw a rectangle on your slide for your YouTube video (Note: Just remember to draw it on a blank part of the slide);
  8. Go to YouTube and choose your preferred video;
  9. Copy the URL link from the address bar (Note: This will not work for YouTube playlists);
  10. Go to the PowerPoint slide with the Shockwave Flash Object;
  11. Right-click on the Shockwave Flash Object and select Properties;
  12. Scroll down to the Movie field and paste the copied URL link.

Note: To ensure that your video playback works, you’ll need to make 2 adjustments:

  • Delete watch? from the URL link;
  • Replace = with / in the URL link.

QUICK TIPS

For All PowerPoint Versions

  1. To easily resize a video, place your mouse cursor at the edges of your inserted YouTube video and click + drag to resize the video to your preference.
  2. For some basic video adjustments for Embed Code, go to YouTube and select your preferred video. Below the video, click on ShareEmbedShow More and select the options you want. Once you have made your selection, copy the changed embed code to use in your PowerPoint presentation.

For PowerPoint Version 2007

To keep your video from looping:

  1. Right-click on the inserted YouTube video and select Properties;
  2. Mark Loop as False.

To stop your video from playing automatically:

  1. Right-click on the inserted YouTube video and select Properties;
  2. Mark Playing as False.

For Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 (same as the PowerPoint 2016 or Office 365)

To add a frame to your video:

  1. Right-click on the inserted YouTube video and select Style;
  2. Choose your preferred frame and you’re ready to go.

Note: Keep in mind to avoid rounded or uneven frames as your video is originally rectangle-shaped.

TO CONCLUDE:

How to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint 2016?

  1. Go to Youtube and copy the URL of the video you want to embed in PowerPoint;
  2. Open PowerPoint and select the slide where you want to insert the video;
  3. Click on Insert tab, then choose Video Online Video;
  4. In the new window, paste the copied URL into the address bar;
  5. Select the video thumbnail that appears and click Enter.

How to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint 2013?

  1. Go to Youtube and copy the URL of the video you want to embed in PowerPoint;
  2. Open PowerPoint and select the slide where you want to insert the video;
  3. Click on Insert tab, then choose Video Online Video;
  4. In the new window, paste the copied URL into the address bar;
  5. Select the video thumbnail that appears and click Enter.

How to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint 2010?

  1. Go to Youtube and copy the URL of the video you want to embed in PowerPoint;
  2. Open PowerPoint and select the slide where you want to insert the video;
  3. Click on Insert tab, then choose Video Online Video;
  4. In the new window, paste the copied URL into the address bar;
  5. Select the video thumbnail that appears and click Enter.

How to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint 2007?

  1. Open your PowerPoint presentation and click on the Microsoft Office button on the top left corner;
  2. Select PowerPoint Options from the dropdown menu;
  3. In the Popular category, ensure that the Show Developer tab is selected and click OK;
  4. Select the slide where you want to add a video, click on the Developer Tab and choose More Controls;
  5. Scroll down to select Shockwave Flash Object and click OK;
  6. Click and drag to draw a rectangle on the slide to hold the YouTube video;
  7. Go to YouTube and copy the URL of the video you want to embed;
  8. Go to the slide with Flash Object, right-click on the Flash Object and click on Properties;
  9. Scroll down to the Movie field and insert the copied URL.

To work with PowerPoint more effective, check out The 20 Most Useful PowerPoint Shortcuts.